Achievements

 
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Our project is volunteer-led and made possible by support from our dedicated volunteer community, our generous funders and supporters, and New Unity, who provide our premises and lots of infrastructural support.

We launched in 2017 and in our first two years we submitted over 150 successful applications for recourse to public funds, as well as providing advice to over 300 families. When given recourse to public funds, these families and individuals have been able to lift themselves out of destitution. In all cases where applications were initially refused, we found public law lawyers to challenge the decisions via judicial review.

In the the past year, we have had a 100% success rate.

We have published a research project to support a strategic challenge to the policy.

We provided lunch, childcare and a warm welcome to around 40 people each week.

We want to continue to grow. Please help by volunteering or donating to our work.

 
The Unity Project is a miracle.

It is the only project dedicated to helping people change the conditions of their leave to gain access to public funds. The work to get a change of conditions is meticulous and intensive but the results are life changing.

I cannot recommend this charity enough.
— Jennifer Blair (Barrister, No.5 Chambers)
The Unity Project has rapidly established itself as an invaluable organisation for tackling destitution.

This flagship project is dedicated to supporting individuals with complex change of conditions applications, which is largely not available elsewhere.

Without the increasingly necessary work of the Unity Project, more people would remain unaware of their rights and end up trapped in destitution and precarious situations.
— Rupinder Parhar (Policy Officer, The Children’s Society)
Making a Change of Conditions application is an overly difficult, complex process which seems designed to ensure that applicants do not even try.

Despite this, The Unity Project has achieved incredible results with extremely limited resources. As long as the No Recourse to Public Funds restriction continues to be applied in its current form, the UK needs a hundred The Unity Projects.

For now, we only have one and we should all support it as best we can.
— Sonia Lenegan (Solicitor; Head of Legal Policy, ILPA)